Download PDF Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship (Robert C. Martin Series)

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Flag arguments are ugly. Passing a boolean into a function is loudly proclaiming that this function does more than one thing. It does one thing if the flag is true and another one if the flag is false. Write learning test when using third-party cody to make sure it behaves the way you expect it to. And if codebase changes in time, at least you find out early enough. The first half of this book is well worth a read. It dovetailed so well into Java because Java has a lot of the same annoying limitations, and in some ways is even harder.

The latter section of the book contains some worked examples that I didn't always agree with because they seemed to be totally over done. A lot of the refactorin The first half of this book is well worth a read. A lot of the refactorings came from limitations in the language and even then felt arbitrary and not that "clean", more like differences of opinion.

In light of this I think the book would have been better titled Clean Java , and then we'd all know where we stand. Have to say I was disappointed by the case studies. I think if you're a jobbing Java programmer you will get a real benefit from this book. I use dynamic languages like Ruby and most of the problems described in need of refactoring just never happen.

View all 6 comments. Apr 14, Vladimir rated it really liked it Shelves: This book makes some very good points, sometimes taking them to extreme "Never write functions longer than 15 lines! Never write functions with more than three arguments! Some of these points were quite new and useful for me - YMMV. It's too Java-specific in a few places, and reading the last refactoring chapter on a kindle was quite a challenge, but otherwise it was well worth a read.

At least I got a clear picture of how I want to refactor a big piece of my current project after reading th This book makes some very good points, sometimes taking them to extreme "Never write functions longer than 15 lines! At least I got a clear picture of how I want to refactor a big piece of my current project after reading this: Feb 21, Nariman rated it it was amazing Shelves: If you are a programmer, you must read it!

Jan 08, Jerry rated it liked it Shelves: I had a tough time deciding between 3 or 4 stars. The book should be called Clean Java Code. Some of the concepts definitely translate to other languages, but it uses Java for all of the examples and some of the chapters are dedicated to Java-specific issues.


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I consider many of the the suggestions to simply be common sense, but I've worked with enough of "other people's code" to realize they don't necessarily agree. With all of that said, I'd definitely recommend the book to Java developers at th I had a tough time deciding between 3 or 4 stars. With all of that said, I'd definitely recommend the book to Java developers at the beginner and intermediate levels. Oct 03, Rod Hilton rated it really liked it Shelves: There is a movement brewing in the world of professional software development.

This movement is concerned not merely with writing functional, correct code, but also on writing good code. Taking pride in code. This movement is the Software Craftsmanship movement , and one of the people near the head of this movement is Robert C. Martin, also known as Uncle Bob. His book "Clean Code" is, in many ways, an introduction to the concept of Software Craftsmanship and a guide for developers interested in b There is a movement brewing in the world of professional software development. His book "Clean Code" is, in many ways, an introduction to the concept of Software Craftsmanship and a guide for developers interested in becoming craftsmen.

Clean Code is not about only writing correct code, it's about writing code that is designed well, code that reads well, and code that expresses the intent of the author. The book is essentially divided into two parts. The first part contains Bob's suggestions for writing and maintaining clean code. This includes suggestions on everything ranging from how to properly comment code and how to properly name variables to how to separate your classes and how to construct testable concurrent code. The second part of the book uses the principles in the first part to guide the reader through a few exercises in which existing code is cleaned.

The first part of the book is fantastic. I can't recommend it highly enough for a professional software developer that wishes to elevate him or herself to a higher standard. This guide is excellent, and gave me lots of things to think about while reading it. I could almost feel myself becoming a better programmer as I internalized Martin's advice, and the code I've been writing has been noticeably better since I began following his suggestions.

In the second part of the book, Martin essentially guides us through three projects: Of these, the most detailed guide is Martin's illustration of refactoring the command line argument parser. These sections all suffered from a fundamental flaw: These sections all required reading large amounts of source code. Not just scanning it, but really reading and understanding the code, so that the reader can understand the changes Martin makes to the code.

Reading and understanding code is something I do every day as a professional, but I never have to do it from paper. When I read code, I'm interacting with something, not just reading. I can scroll up and down. If I see a method being used and I wonder how it's written, I can click on it and jump right to the implementation. My IDE shows me symbols in my gutterbar when methods are overridden. I can press a keystroke to pull up a list of just the methods in a source file. I can right click on a method and find its usages immediately. The source code I am reading is something I can push and pull, gaining an understanding of it through interaction.

When source code is printed in a book, you get none of this. To make matters worse, Martin's code samples have absolutely no syntax highlighting applied to them. When I read source code, certain parts are rendered in specific ways that make it easier to pull the information into my brain. Strings and literals are formatted differently, comments are dimmer so I can focus on code, and so on. Code samples in "Clean Code" are just characters, with occasionally bolding used to draw attention to parts that were changed. It's amazing how much syntax highlighting helps make code more comprehensible, even at a completely subconscious level.

A book is, quite simply, not an appropriate medium for a guided code walkthrough. I'd have preferred the content of these sections as perhaps a lecture, with Martin's text done in audio and his code kept on the screen. This would at least prevent me from having to flip back and forth constantly. I didn't get as much out of these sections as I would have liked to, simply because it was so difficult to digest the information it contained in such an awkward, unnatural medium. At the very least, the code samples should have been printed in color, with syntax highlighting. I can tell that his advice was good and that the refactorings he applied to the code samples in the book made the code far better, but mostly because I've observed these efforts in real life and observed how much they improve code.

If I were to encounter Martin's "before" and "after" code in a project I was working on, I undoubtedly would find the "after" code far, far cleaner and more enjoyable to work with. However, since the book format made it so difficult to understand EITHER code sample, it didn't seem like Martin's efforts offered much improvement, even though I know they did. Despite this frustration, the book is an excellent read, and I'm quite certain it has contributed a great deal to helping me improve as a professional.

I can't recommend it enough, especially for Java developers. I just think that most readers will find the final few chapters intensely frustrating - I recommend downloading the code and viewing it in your favorite code editor so that you can comprehend the source code the way you would any other source code. Oct 03, Carl-eric rated it liked it Shelves: Many good points in this book.

Unfortunately, almost all of them are overdone. Yes, you should write short functions, if possible. Yes, you should have functions that do one thing. But no, "one thing" does not mean you should tear an algorithm apart into twenty little funclets that make no sense on their own. Basically, like another reviewer wrote, the first part of the book raises many good points, and the second part of the book then merrily applies these points way beyond their usefulness. Read Many good points in this book.

Read the book, but keep your brains turned on and be alert. View all 3 comments. Feb 07, Kosala Nuwan Perera rated it really liked it. I had a tough time deciding whether I really liked or It was amazing. I liked the writing style of the book. Its simple, clean, and well crafted. First few chapters of the book makes good practical advice from naming variables-functions-classes to writing functions to testing. Most of the smells and heuristics I found in these chapters can be found in real-world as well.

It sucks the life out of developers, it makes products difficult to plan, build, and test. Most freshman programmers like most grade-schoolers don't follow this advice particularly well. They believe that the primary goal is to get the program working. Once it's "working", they move on to the next task, leaving the "working" program in whatever state they finally got it to "work". Most seasoned programmers know that this is professional suicide.

Latter sections of the book is more into Java centric, and thought of skimming few sections disappointingly but was compelled to continue reading.

The book must titled "Clean Code Java ". Though this book makes more sense for Java developers at the beginners and intermediate levels, I would definitely recommend the book to any. NET C developers as well. All in all, it was well worth a read! I got a clear picture of how developers end up with smelly code and how we can refine and "clean" it up. Clean Code by Robert C. Oct 07, David rated it it was ok Shelves: This is a book that one could get started on the idea of "good code" - clean, readable, elegant, simple, easy-to-test, etc.

It has the usual stuff that you'd expect - good naming convention, testable code, single responsibility, short classes, short methods - but I feel like it takes them on overdose, going to extremes IMHO such setting short explicit lengths, forbidding certain constructs, and what seems like refactoring for the sake of it. I'd actually recommend other books like the Pragmatic This is a book that one could get started on the idea of "good code" - clean, readable, elegant, simple, easy-to-test, etc.

I'd actually recommend other books like the Pragmatic Programmer or Code Complete though; there's something about the way this book reads irks me. I think it's more useful to highlight the attributes that clean code should have which this book does do , then it is to declare outright what is "good" and what is "bad" even in subjective areas like readability, comments, and formatting.

To their credit, the author s did state right out at the start that these are their very personal preferences, so that's all right - I'm just disagreeing on some of the more subjective areas. Jan 04, Craig Vermeer rated it it was amazing Shelves: This had lots of good, practical advice that spanned everything from naming to testing to concurrency. A lot of it was pretty Java centric, so I skimmed a few sections. By far the best portions of the book were the ones where the author demonstrates -- step by step -- his process for writing code test-first, as well as refactoring.

He just surrounds it with tests, and then little by little refines it and cleans it up. Feb 21, Babak Ghadiri rated it liked it. Mar 12, Alex Ott rated it liked it Shelves: Nothing new for experienced developer Too Java oriented in many places. Code Complete, 2ed is better from my point of view. May 01, Yevgeniy Brikman rated it it was amazing. A good book to read for any coder - perhaps not as thorough as Code Complete but much more effective than Pragmatic Programmer. This book's biggest strength is that it includes tons of code examples, including some fairly long and in depth ones.

Instead of just listing rules or principles of clean code, many of the chapters go through these code examples and iteratively improve them. The rules and principles fall out of this process and the reader is a part of developing them, which is an effect A good book to read for any coder - perhaps not as thorough as Code Complete but much more effective than Pragmatic Programmer. The rules and principles fall out of this process and the reader is a part of developing them, which is an effective way to learn. I also liked the justification for why clean code matters in the intro chapters.

However, there was not enough discussion of real world trade offs. In fact, the book compares code to poetry and art and makes a point to mention that neither is ever done. And yet, everyone needs to ship at some point. So when is code not just clean, but clean enough? Some fun quotes from Clean Code: We want the factory running at top speed to produce software. These are human factories: Yet even in the auto industry, the bulk of the work lies not in manufacturing but in maintenance—or its avoidance.

You should name a variable using the same care with which you name a first-born child. Quality is the result of a million selfless acts of care—not just of any great method that descends from the heavens. You are reading this book for two reasons. First, you are a programmer.

Second, you want to be a better programmer. We need better programmers. Remember that code is really the language in which we ultimately express the requirements. I could list all of the qualities that I notice in clean code, but there is one overarching quality that leads to all of them. I've been programming about 17 years and consider myself above average programmer. Yet, this book made me feel like I'm actually horrible coder. I've always gotten my tasks done but I didn't pay attention on refactoring to clean up the code. I'm already behind and got a demo coming up in few days.

As I'm reading my guilty verdicts on all his 'bad code' examples, it inspire me to care about 'coding' yet again. It can be fun and it's not all about getting the job done. What's sad about the reality is that 'bad code' will continually increase over time because people don't realize what 'bad code' can do in the long run.

Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship

Every programmer regardless of experience should read this book. I've been reading this for the past few weeks and just by applying the principles and concepts I've learned so far, I've become a better and more mature developer. The lead dev on my team recently noticed and commented on the positive changes in my code as of late. He was also impressed when I used what I learned to refactor a bit of our code base.

Even though it's Java-based and I am a Go developer with a background that is primarily JS, I've been able to use the ideas in this book to clean up my own code, both personally and professionally. This is a critical thinkers book. It gives the reader a basis to use within their own programming style and language of choice. The code examples are written in Java and are there to show how to refactor code based on the principles and reasoning within the book. This is not a book that I take as a specific do this or else, more of a guide that explains why you should consider writing code in the way described.

Essentially the lesson is to create code that is small, has a specific purpose and does that one thing. When functions or methods begin to stray into doing multiple things spin those code pieces off on their own and repeat. What I get from this book is a mindset or way of thinking about programming.

To create code that is cohesive, is small, does not have unnecessary parts. When these principles are broken find a way to refactor or eliminate the additional pieces. It is not just about taking away or keeping code small but adopting a way of thinking about the design of the program and how each piece interacts with the other parts. Even bad code can function. But if code isn't clean, it can bring a development organization to its knees. Every year, countless hours and significant resources are lost because of poorly written code. But it doesn't have to be that way.

Noted software expert Robert C. Martin presents a revolutionary paradigm with "Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship. What kind of work will you be doing?

IMO Episode 10 - Interview With Uncle Bob (Robert) C. Martin

You'll be reading code--lots of code. And you will be challenged to think about what's right about that code, and what's wrong with it. More importantly, you will be challenged to reassess your professional values and your commitment to your craft. The first describes the principles, patterns, and practices of writing clean code.

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The second part consists of several case studies of increasing complexity. Each case study is an exercise in cleaning up code--of transforming a code base that has some problems into one that is sound and efficient. The third part is the payoff: The result is a knowledge base that describes the way we think when we write, read, and clean code. Readers will come away from this book understanding How to tell the difference between good and bad codeHow to write good code and how to transform bad code into good codeHow to create good names, good functions, good objects, and good classesHow to format code for maximum readabilityHow to implement complete error handling without obscuring code logicHow to unit test and practice test-driven developmentThis book is a must for any developer, software engineer, project manager, team lead, or systems analyst with an interest in producing better code.

He is founder and president of Object Mentor, Inc. Would you like to tell us about a lower price? If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support? Learn more about Amazon Prime. Martin presents a revolutionary paradigm with Clean Code: Clean Code is divided into three parts. Each case study is an exercise in cleaning up code—of transforming a code base that has some problems into one that is sound and efficient. Readers will come away from this book understanding How to tell the difference between good and bad code How to write good code and how to transform bad code into good code How to create good names, good functions, good objects, and good classes How to format code for maximum readability How to implement complete error handling without obscuring code logic How to unit test and practice test-driven development This book is a must for any developer, software engineer, project manager, team lead, or systems analyst with an interest in producing better code.

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